open access

Vol 52, No 2 (2021)
Original research article
Submitted: 2021-03-25
Accepted: 2021-03-25
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Allogeneic stem cell transplantation remains an effective therapeutic approach for patients with therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia

Adrianna Spałek, Krzysztof Woźniczka, Anna Armatys, Konrad Matlak, Anna Koclęga, Dariusz Kata, Agata Wieczorkiewicz-Kabut, Grzegorz Helbig
DOI: 10.5603/AHP.2021.0016
·
Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(2):103-109.

open access

Vol 52, No 2 (2021)
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
Submitted: 2021-03-25
Accepted: 2021-03-25

Abstract

Introduction: Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) remains a late consequence of exposure to cytotoxic chemo- and/or radiotherapy for prior malignant or non-malignant disorders. The prognosis of t-AML is extremely poor, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) seems to be the most effective therapeutic approach.We evaluated the efficacy and safety of allo-SCT for t-AML preceded by solid tumors and lymphomas. Material and methods: Study patients were retrospectively identified using our institutional database. Nineteen patients (12 female, 7 male), median age 53 years, underwent allo-SCT for t-AML between 2006 and 2018. Results: Prior malignancy was diagnosed at median age of 43.9 years. Among 19 patients included in the study, 6 (32%) had prior breast cancer, 2 (11%) were diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer, and 2 (11%) were treated for lymphoma. A variety of other cancers were diagnosed in the remaining 9 patients. Median time from previous malignancy to devel­opment of t-AML was 4.9 years. Fourteen patients (74%) were transplanted in first complete remission (CR1), 4 patients (21%) were in CR2, and 1 patient received graft being in active disease. 10 patients (53%) are alive at last contact in CR. Patients died mainly from infectious complications. Median follow-up from prior malignancy and from transplanta­tion was 9.5 years and 1.82 years, respectively. The 2-year overall survival (OS) was 57%. Median OS for survivors is 4.08 years. Grafts from unrelated donors and the presence of acute graft-versus-host disease affected OS. Conclusions: Allo-SCT remains an effective therapy for t-AML

Abstract

Introduction: Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) remains a late consequence of exposure to cytotoxic chemo- and/or radiotherapy for prior malignant or non-malignant disorders. The prognosis of t-AML is extremely poor, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) seems to be the most effective therapeutic approach.We evaluated the efficacy and safety of allo-SCT for t-AML preceded by solid tumors and lymphomas. Material and methods: Study patients were retrospectively identified using our institutional database. Nineteen patients (12 female, 7 male), median age 53 years, underwent allo-SCT for t-AML between 2006 and 2018. Results: Prior malignancy was diagnosed at median age of 43.9 years. Among 19 patients included in the study, 6 (32%) had prior breast cancer, 2 (11%) were diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer, and 2 (11%) were treated for lymphoma. A variety of other cancers were diagnosed in the remaining 9 patients. Median time from previous malignancy to devel­opment of t-AML was 4.9 years. Fourteen patients (74%) were transplanted in first complete remission (CR1), 4 patients (21%) were in CR2, and 1 patient received graft being in active disease. 10 patients (53%) are alive at last contact in CR. Patients died mainly from infectious complications. Median follow-up from prior malignancy and from transplanta­tion was 9.5 years and 1.82 years, respectively. The 2-year overall survival (OS) was 57%. Median OS for survivors is 4.08 years. Grafts from unrelated donors and the presence of acute graft-versus-host disease affected OS. Conclusions: Allo-SCT remains an effective therapy for t-AML

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Keywords

therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia, solid tumor, lymphoma, allogeneic stem cell transplantation, survival

About this article
Title

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation remains an effective therapeutic approach for patients with therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia

Journal

Acta Haematologica Polonica

Issue

Vol 52, No 2 (2021)

Article type

Original research article

Pages

103-109

DOI

10.5603/AHP.2021.0016

Bibliographic record

Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(2):103-109.

Keywords

therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia
solid tumor
lymphoma
allogeneic stem cell transplantation
survival

Authors

Adrianna Spałek
Krzysztof Woźniczka
Anna Armatys
Konrad Matlak
Anna Koclęga
Dariusz Kata
Agata Wieczorkiewicz-Kabut
Grzegorz Helbig

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