open access

Vol 26, No 1 (2020)
Original papers
Published online: 2020-03-25
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Infection-related complications in patients with end stage renal failure dialyzed through a permanent catheter

Anna Szarnecka-Sojda, Wojciech Jacheć, Maciej Polewczyk, Agnieszka Łętek, Jarosław Miszczuk, Anna Polewczyk
DOI: 10.5603/AA.2020.0002
·
Acta Angiologica 2020;26(1):9-18.

open access

Vol 26, No 1 (2020)
Original papers
Published online: 2020-03-25

Abstract

Objectives Progression of renal failure leads to an increase in the number of patients who require forming dialysis access. Old age and a rising morbidity make it impossible to form a native arteriovenous fistula and a permanent catheter becomes the first choice. The presence of a catheter frequently generates complications, including infections, which may result in a higher mortality rate. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis data has been conducted, involving 398 patients who had permanent catheters implanted from 2010 to 2016. Out of this group, 65 patients who suffered infection-related complications have been identified. Risk factors for infection and a survival rate of the population have been estimated. Results Between 2010 and 2016, 495 catheters were implanted for 398 patients aged 68.73(13.26) years on average. 92 catheter-related infections (23.1%) were recorded in 65 patients. A higher risk of infection has been noted among younger patients, with coronary disease and heart failure. Patients affected by infection had 35.38% survivability as against 38.14% for those with no infection: p= 0.312. A higher mortality risk was identified among patients suffering catheter-related infections with cardiac implants and vascular prostheses. Unfavourable prognosis was for infections occurring together with hypotension, high leucocytosis, a low number of platelets and a high leukocyte/platelet ratio. Conclusion Dialysis patients who use permanent catheters run a high risk of infection-related complications, especially younger patients suffering from coronary conditions and heart failure. Severe catheter-related infections lead to a high mortality rate, therefore it is necessary to limit this form of access.

Abstract

Objectives Progression of renal failure leads to an increase in the number of patients who require forming dialysis access. Old age and a rising morbidity make it impossible to form a native arteriovenous fistula and a permanent catheter becomes the first choice. The presence of a catheter frequently generates complications, including infections, which may result in a higher mortality rate. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis data has been conducted, involving 398 patients who had permanent catheters implanted from 2010 to 2016. Out of this group, 65 patients who suffered infection-related complications have been identified. Risk factors for infection and a survival rate of the population have been estimated. Results Between 2010 and 2016, 495 catheters were implanted for 398 patients aged 68.73(13.26) years on average. 92 catheter-related infections (23.1%) were recorded in 65 patients. A higher risk of infection has been noted among younger patients, with coronary disease and heart failure. Patients affected by infection had 35.38% survivability as against 38.14% for those with no infection: p= 0.312. A higher mortality risk was identified among patients suffering catheter-related infections with cardiac implants and vascular prostheses. Unfavourable prognosis was for infections occurring together with hypotension, high leucocytosis, a low number of platelets and a high leukocyte/platelet ratio. Conclusion Dialysis patients who use permanent catheters run a high risk of infection-related complications, especially younger patients suffering from coronary conditions and heart failure. Severe catheter-related infections lead to a high mortality rate, therefore it is necessary to limit this form of access.

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Keywords

end-stage renal disease; permanent dialysis catheter; risk of infection-related complications; death risk

About this article
Title

Infection-related complications in patients with end stage renal failure dialyzed through a permanent catheter

Journal

Acta Angiologica

Issue

Vol 26, No 1 (2020)

Pages

9-18

Published online

2020-03-25

DOI

10.5603/AA.2020.0002

Bibliographic record

Acta Angiologica 2020;26(1):9-18.

Keywords

end-stage renal disease
permanent dialysis catheter
risk of infection-related complications
death risk

Authors

Anna Szarnecka-Sojda
Wojciech Jacheć
Maciej Polewczyk
Agnieszka Łętek
Jarosław Miszczuk
Anna Polewczyk

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