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Vol 25, No 4 (2019)
Guidelines
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Polskie wytyczne postępowania w chorobie tętnic kończyn dolnych (LEAD) na podstawie wytycznych ESVS/ESC 2017 — stanowisko ekspertów Polskiego Towarzystwa Chirurgii Naczyniowej, Polskiego Towarzystwa Nadciśnienia Tętniczego, Polskiego Towarzystwa Leczenia Ran oraz Sekcji Farmakoterapii Sercowo-Naczyniowej Polskiego Towarzystwa Kardiologicznego

Arkadiusz Jawień, Krzysztof J. Filipiak, Andrzej Bręborowicz, Beata Mrozikiewicz-Rakowska, Filip M. Szymański, Piotr Terlecki, Tomasz Zubilewicz
Acta Angiologica 2019;25(4).

open access

Vol 25, No 4 (2019)
Guidelines

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LEAD, wytyczne, polskie wytyczne

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Polskie wytyczne postępowania w chorobie tętnic kończyn dolnych (LEAD) na podstawie wytycznych ESVS/ESC 2017 — stanowisko ekspertów Polskiego Towarzystwa Chirurgii Naczyniowej, Polskiego Towarzystwa Nadciśnienia Tętniczego, Polskiego Towarzystwa Leczenia Ran oraz Sekcji Farmakoterapii Sercowo-Naczyniowej Polskiego Towarzystwa Kardiologicznego

Journal

Acta Angiologica

Issue

Vol 25, No 4 (2019)

Bibliographic record

Acta Angiologica 2019;25(4).

Keywords

LEAD
wytyczne
polskie wytyczne

Authors

Arkadiusz Jawień
Krzysztof J. Filipiak
Andrzej Bręborowicz
Beata Mrozikiewicz-Rakowska
Filip M. Szymański
Piotr Terlecki
Tomasz Zubilewicz

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