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Vol 25, No 2 (2019)
Zalecenia
Published online: 2019-05-23
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The position of Polish experts on conservative management in patients with artery diseases of lower limbs

Zbigniew Krasinski, Zbigniew Gaciong, Filip Szymański, Radosław Kowalewski, Tomasz Urbanek
DOI: 10.5603/AA.2019.0007
·
Acta Angiologica 2019;25(2):41-76.

open access

Vol 25, No 2 (2019)
Zalecenia
Published online: 2019-05-23

Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common disease, though not very well known and often diagnosed on a very late
stage, causing not only typical complications such as intermittent claudication, critical limb ischemia or amputations,
but also to cardiovascular mortality. The risk of cardiovascular death can be even 11 times higher in patients with
symptomatic PAD than in healthy patients. The risk of heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular death is even higher,
reaching almost 4% within one year, nearly equal to the risk for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In
those patients, the 5-year mortality risk is estimated at 10–15%, with cardiovascular disorders being the most
likely cause of death. In patients with critical limb ischemia, the risk of cardiovascular death within one year can be
as high as 25% and the risk of amputation — 30%.
It is estimated that the global population of patients with PAD is over 120 million. The incidence of the diseases
is 3–10%, but in patients aged 70 and more, the incidence increases to 14–29%. In Poland, around 4,000 people
are hospitalized every year for PAD of lower limbs. The number of PAD-related amputations is over 9,000 per year.
Although the methods of PAD diagnosis (e.g. ABI) are often easy and non-invasive, they are scarcely used in clinical
practice. Also, optimal conservative management in the form of quitting smoking, modifying the cardiovascular risk
factors and supervised exercise is often overlooked.
PAD is a major issue not only for vascular surgery, but also for many other medical specializations, including
angiology, general medicine, cardiology, or diabetology. As a result of long waiting times for the next visit and lack
of access to patient programmes and reimbursed drugs, patients with PAD often report to the doctor when their
condition is very serious. Despite the 2017 ESC guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery
disease, prepared together with ESVS, not all healthcare professionals have access to the latest knowledge on PAD
diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, though published recently, the ESC’s guidelines do not include some of
the recent studies, among them the possibly breakthrough COMPASS trial which has the potential to change the
paradigm of management of patients with PAD.
We must bear in mind that the population with PAD is a difficult patient group who need new treatment methods
and optimization of the existing ones in order to visibly improve diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.

Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common disease, though not very well known and often diagnosed on a very late
stage, causing not only typical complications such as intermittent claudication, critical limb ischemia or amputations,
but also to cardiovascular mortality. The risk of cardiovascular death can be even 11 times higher in patients with
symptomatic PAD than in healthy patients. The risk of heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular death is even higher,
reaching almost 4% within one year, nearly equal to the risk for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In
those patients, the 5-year mortality risk is estimated at 10–15%, with cardiovascular disorders being the most
likely cause of death. In patients with critical limb ischemia, the risk of cardiovascular death within one year can be
as high as 25% and the risk of amputation — 30%.
It is estimated that the global population of patients with PAD is over 120 million. The incidence of the diseases
is 3–10%, but in patients aged 70 and more, the incidence increases to 14–29%. In Poland, around 4,000 people
are hospitalized every year for PAD of lower limbs. The number of PAD-related amputations is over 9,000 per year.
Although the methods of PAD diagnosis (e.g. ABI) are often easy and non-invasive, they are scarcely used in clinical
practice. Also, optimal conservative management in the form of quitting smoking, modifying the cardiovascular risk
factors and supervised exercise is often overlooked.
PAD is a major issue not only for vascular surgery, but also for many other medical specializations, including
angiology, general medicine, cardiology, or diabetology. As a result of long waiting times for the next visit and lack
of access to patient programmes and reimbursed drugs, patients with PAD often report to the doctor when their
condition is very serious. Despite the 2017 ESC guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery
disease, prepared together with ESVS, not all healthcare professionals have access to the latest knowledge on PAD
diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, though published recently, the ESC’s guidelines do not include some of
the recent studies, among them the possibly breakthrough COMPASS trial which has the potential to change the
paradigm of management of patients with PAD.
We must bear in mind that the population with PAD is a difficult patient group who need new treatment methods
and optimization of the existing ones in order to visibly improve diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.

Get Citation

Keywords

peripheral artery disease, diseases of lower limbs

About this article
Title

The position of Polish experts on conservative management in patients with artery diseases of lower limbs

Journal

Acta Angiologica

Issue

Vol 25, No 2 (2019)

Pages

41-76

Published online

2019-05-23

DOI

10.5603/AA.2019.0007

Bibliographic record

Acta Angiologica 2019;25(2):41-76.

Keywords

peripheral artery disease
diseases of lower limbs

Authors

Zbigniew Krasinski
Zbigniew Gaciong
Filip Szymański
Radosław Kowalewski
Tomasz Urbanek

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