open access

Vol 24, No 4 (2018)
Review papers
Published online: 2018-12-05
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The role of VEGF in psoriasis: an update

Agnieszka Gerkowicz, Mateusz Socha, Aldona Pietrzak, Tomasz Zubilewicz, Dorota Krasowska
DOI: 10.5603/AA.2018.0019
·
Acta Angiologica 2018;24(4):134-140.

open access

Vol 24, No 4 (2018)
Review papers
Published online: 2018-12-05

Abstract

Psoriasis is a common, chronic immune-mediated multifactorial skin disease. In its pathogenesis altered differentiation
and hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, dysregulation of immunological cell functions, together with
abnormal angiogenesis are involved. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new blood vessels from the
pre-existing vascular bed. This complex and multistep process is regulated by different factors among which
vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered to be the most important. The aim of this paper is
a review of the current literature considering the role of vascular endothelial growth factor in psoriasis. Many
studies have focused on the role of VEGF in psoriasis and revealed its increased serum and tissue levels which
correlated with disease severity. Recent data indicate that VEGF is not only responsible for angiogenesis, but
also regulates keratinocyte differentiation. Moreover, it has been suggested that vascular endothelial growth
factor could be a link between psoriasis and its comorbidities. So far, there are single clinical cases that reported
clearance of psoriasis after anti-VEGF therapy. Therefore, the VEGF pathway might be a potential new therapeutic
alternative leading to improvement of psoriasis. However, further clinical studies are needed to evaluate
the efficacy and safety of this therapy in psoriasis.

Abstract

Psoriasis is a common, chronic immune-mediated multifactorial skin disease. In its pathogenesis altered differentiation
and hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, dysregulation of immunological cell functions, together with
abnormal angiogenesis are involved. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new blood vessels from the
pre-existing vascular bed. This complex and multistep process is regulated by different factors among which
vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered to be the most important. The aim of this paper is
a review of the current literature considering the role of vascular endothelial growth factor in psoriasis. Many
studies have focused on the role of VEGF in psoriasis and revealed its increased serum and tissue levels which
correlated with disease severity. Recent data indicate that VEGF is not only responsible for angiogenesis, but
also regulates keratinocyte differentiation. Moreover, it has been suggested that vascular endothelial growth
factor could be a link between psoriasis and its comorbidities. So far, there are single clinical cases that reported
clearance of psoriasis after anti-VEGF therapy. Therefore, the VEGF pathway might be a potential new therapeutic
alternative leading to improvement of psoriasis. However, further clinical studies are needed to evaluate
the efficacy and safety of this therapy in psoriasis.

Get Citation

Keywords

psoriasis, angiogenesis, VEGF

About this article
Title

The role of VEGF in psoriasis: an update

Journal

Acta Angiologica

Issue

Vol 24, No 4 (2018)

Pages

134-140

Published online

2018-12-05

DOI

10.5603/AA.2018.0019

Bibliographic record

Acta Angiologica 2018;24(4):134-140.

Keywords

psoriasis
angiogenesis
VEGF

Authors

Agnieszka Gerkowicz
Mateusz Socha
Aldona Pietrzak
Tomasz Zubilewicz
Dorota Krasowska

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