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Vol 22, No 3 (2016)
Guidelines
Published online: 2017-02-10
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Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in cancer patients — guidelines focus on surgical patients

Tomasz Urbanek, Zbigniew Krasiński, Maciej Kostrubiec, Wojciech Sydor, Piotr Wysocki, Artur Antoniewicz, Beata Begier-Krasińska, Wojciech Dyszkiewicz, Jan Kulig, Piotr Ładziński, Janina Markowska, Rodryg Ramlau, Piotr Rutkowski, Stefan Sajdak, Damian Ziaja, Krzysztof Ziaja
DOI: 10.5603/AA.2016.0011
·
Acta Angiologica 2016;22(3):71-102.

open access

Vol 22, No 3 (2016)
Guidelines
Published online: 2017-02-10

Abstract

Although venous thromboembolism (VTE) is quite common in patients suffering from different stages of cancer, it is still an underestimated problem. Oncological treatment, surgeries, and advanced-stage cancer are only some risk factors for VTE, which is one of the most common causes of death in cancer patients. Differences in the risk of deep-venous thrombosis and its complications, including risk of bleeding, between particular onco­logical patient groups suggests that there is a need for individual risk assessment and prophylaxis dedicated to specific clinical situations and patients. They also give grounds for constant update of guidelines on prophylaxis in cancer patients. This document contains venous thromboembolism prophylaxis guidelines in oncology patients with focus on surgical cancer.

Abstract

Although venous thromboembolism (VTE) is quite common in patients suffering from different stages of cancer, it is still an underestimated problem. Oncological treatment, surgeries, and advanced-stage cancer are only some risk factors for VTE, which is one of the most common causes of death in cancer patients. Differences in the risk of deep-venous thrombosis and its complications, including risk of bleeding, between particular onco­logical patient groups suggests that there is a need for individual risk assessment and prophylaxis dedicated to specific clinical situations and patients. They also give grounds for constant update of guidelines on prophylaxis in cancer patients. This document contains venous thromboembolism prophylaxis guidelines in oncology patients with focus on surgical cancer.

Get Citation

Keywords

venous thromboembolism, cancer, cancer surgery, VTE prophylaxis, anti-cancer treatment

About this article
Title

Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in cancer patients — guidelines focus on surgical patients

Journal

Acta Angiologica

Issue

Vol 22, No 3 (2016)

Pages

71-102

Published online

2017-02-10

DOI

10.5603/AA.2016.0011

Bibliographic record

Acta Angiologica 2016;22(3):71-102.

Keywords

venous thromboembolism
cancer
cancer surgery
VTE prophylaxis
anti-cancer treatment

Authors

Tomasz Urbanek
Zbigniew Krasiński
Maciej Kostrubiec
Wojciech Sydor
Piotr Wysocki
Artur Antoniewicz
Beata Begier-Krasińska
Wojciech Dyszkiewicz
Jan Kulig
Piotr Ładziński
Janina Markowska
Rodryg Ramlau
Piotr Rutkowski
Stefan Sajdak
Damian Ziaja
Krzysztof Ziaja

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